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“Why sit ye here and Die”? Counter-Hegemonic Histories of the Black Female Intellectual in Nineteenth Century America

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Abstract

This paper examines the work and lives of black female activist-Intellectuals in the years before the formation of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACWC) in 1896. Looking deeper at arguments originally made by Maria Stewart, concerning the denial of black women's ambitions and limiting potential in their working lives, the analysis employs the work of the Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci, in particular his notion of the intellectual, to help reflect on the centrality of these black women in the development of an early counterhegemonic movement.

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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1005-1031
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of American Studies
Volume54
Issue number5
Early online date20 Feb 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020
Peer-reviewedYes

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