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Ownership status influences the degree of joint facilitatory behavior

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Ownership status influences the degree of joint facilitatory behavior. / Constable, Merryn D.; Bayliss, Andrew P.; Tipper, Steven P.; Spaniol, Ana P.; Pratt, Jay; Welsh, Timothy N.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 27, No. 10, 10.2016, p. 1371-1378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Constable, MD, Bayliss, AP, Tipper, SP, Spaniol, AP, Pratt, J & Welsh, TN 2016, 'Ownership status influences the degree of joint facilitatory behavior', Psychological Science, vol. 27, no. 10, pp. 1371-1378. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797616661544

APA

Constable, M. D., Bayliss, A. P., Tipper, S. P., Spaniol, A. P., Pratt, J., & Welsh, T. N. (2016). Ownership status influences the degree of joint facilitatory behavior. Psychological Science, 27(10), 1371-1378. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797616661544

Vancouver

Author

Constable, Merryn D. ; Bayliss, Andrew P. ; Tipper, Steven P. ; Spaniol, Ana P. ; Pratt, Jay ; Welsh, Timothy N. / Ownership status influences the degree of joint facilitatory behavior. In: Psychological Science. 2016 ; Vol. 27, No. 10. pp. 1371-1378.

Bibtex- Download

@article{bdc4eb166a104824b4f6da5d3618e38a,
title = "Ownership status influences the degree of joint facilitatory behavior",
abstract = "When engaging in joint activities, humans tend to sacrifice some of their own sensorimotor comfort and efficiency to facilitate their co-actor{\textquoteright}s performance. Here, we investigated if ownership - a socio-culturally based non-physical feature ascribed to objects - influences facilitatory motor behavior in joint action. Participants passed mugs that differed in ownership status across a table to a co-actor. Across two experiments, we found that participants oriented the handle less towards their partner when passing their own mug relative to a mug owned by their co-actor (Experiment 1) and a mug owned by the Experimenter (Experiment 2). These findings indicate that individuals plan and execute actions that assist collaborators, but less so if it is the individual{\textquoteright}s own property that the partner intends to manipulate. We discuss these findings in terms of underlying variables associated with ownership and conclude that a {\textquoteleft}self-other distinction{\textquoteright} can be instated in the human sensorimotor system. ",
keywords = "ownership, joint action, beginning-state comfort, action prediction, response selection, shared task representation, self-relevance",
author = "Constable, {Merryn D.} and Bayliss, {Andrew P.} and Tipper, {Steven P.} and Spaniol, {Ana P.} and Jay Pratt and Welsh, {Timothy N.}",
year = "2016",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1177/0956797616661544",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "1371--1378",
journal = "Psychological Science",
issn = "0956-7976",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc",
number = "10",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ownership status influences the degree of joint facilitatory behavior

AU - Constable, Merryn D.

AU - Bayliss, Andrew P.

AU - Tipper, Steven P.

AU - Spaniol, Ana P.

AU - Pratt, Jay

AU - Welsh, Timothy N.

PY - 2016/10

Y1 - 2016/10

N2 - When engaging in joint activities, humans tend to sacrifice some of their own sensorimotor comfort and efficiency to facilitate their co-actor’s performance. Here, we investigated if ownership - a socio-culturally based non-physical feature ascribed to objects - influences facilitatory motor behavior in joint action. Participants passed mugs that differed in ownership status across a table to a co-actor. Across two experiments, we found that participants oriented the handle less towards their partner when passing their own mug relative to a mug owned by their co-actor (Experiment 1) and a mug owned by the Experimenter (Experiment 2). These findings indicate that individuals plan and execute actions that assist collaborators, but less so if it is the individual’s own property that the partner intends to manipulate. We discuss these findings in terms of underlying variables associated with ownership and conclude that a ‘self-other distinction’ can be instated in the human sensorimotor system.

AB - When engaging in joint activities, humans tend to sacrifice some of their own sensorimotor comfort and efficiency to facilitate their co-actor’s performance. Here, we investigated if ownership - a socio-culturally based non-physical feature ascribed to objects - influences facilitatory motor behavior in joint action. Participants passed mugs that differed in ownership status across a table to a co-actor. Across two experiments, we found that participants oriented the handle less towards their partner when passing their own mug relative to a mug owned by their co-actor (Experiment 1) and a mug owned by the Experimenter (Experiment 2). These findings indicate that individuals plan and execute actions that assist collaborators, but less so if it is the individual’s own property that the partner intends to manipulate. We discuss these findings in terms of underlying variables associated with ownership and conclude that a ‘self-other distinction’ can be instated in the human sensorimotor system.

KW - ownership

KW - joint action

KW - beginning-state comfort

KW - action prediction

KW - response selection

KW - shared task representation

KW - self-relevance

U2 - 10.1177/0956797616661544

DO - 10.1177/0956797616661544

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 1371

EP - 1378

JO - Psychological Science

JF - Psychological Science

SN - 0956-7976

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 83742324