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Influence of Vitamin D Supplementation by Sunlight or Oral D3 on Exercise Performance

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Influence of Vitamin D Supplementation by Sunlight or Oral D3 on Exercise Performance. / Carswell, Alexander T; Oliver, Samuel J; Wentz, Laurel M; Kashi, Daniel S; Roberts, Ross; Tang, Jonathan C Y; Izard, Rachel M; Jackson, Sarah; Allan, Donald; Rhodes, Lesley E; Fraser, William D; Greeves, Julie P; Walsh, Neil P (Lead Author).

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 50, No. 12, 12.2018, p. 2555–2564.

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Carswell, AT, Oliver, SJ, Wentz, LM, Kashi, DS, Roberts, R, Tang, JCY, Izard, RM, Jackson, S, Allan, D, Rhodes, LE, Fraser, WD, Greeves, JP & Walsh, NP 2018, 'Influence of Vitamin D Supplementation by Sunlight or Oral D3 on Exercise Performance', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 50, no. 12, pp. 2555–2564. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000001721

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Carswell, Alexander T ; Oliver, Samuel J ; Wentz, Laurel M ; Kashi, Daniel S ; Roberts, Ross ; Tang, Jonathan C Y ; Izard, Rachel M ; Jackson, Sarah ; Allan, Donald ; Rhodes, Lesley E ; Fraser, William D ; Greeves, Julie P ; Walsh, Neil P. / Influence of Vitamin D Supplementation by Sunlight or Oral D3 on Exercise Performance. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2018 ; Vol. 50, No. 12. pp. 2555–2564.

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@article{604c5b2e7947460c9827d79d329953e4,
title = "Influence of Vitamin D Supplementation by Sunlight or Oral D3 on Exercise Performance",
abstract = "Purpose: To determine the relationship between vitamin D status and exercise performance in a large, prospective cohort study of young men and women across seasons (Study-1). Then, in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, to investigate the effects on exercise performance of achieving vitamin D sufficiency (serum 25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol·L-1) by a unique comparison of safe, simulated-sunlight and oral vitamin D3 supplementation in wintertime (Study-2). Methods: In Study-1, we determined 25(OH)D relationship with exercise performance in 967 military recruits. In Study-2, 137 men received either placebo, simulated-sunlight (1.3x standard erythemal dose in T-shirt and shorts, three-times-per-week for 4-weeks and then once-per-week for 8-weeks) or oral vitamin D3 (1,000 IU[BULLET OPERATOR]day-1 for 4-weeks and then 400 IU[BULLET OPERATOR]day-1 for 8-weeks). We measured serum 25(OH)D by LC-MS/MS and endurance, strength and power by 1.5-mile run, maximum-dynamic-lift and vertical jump, respectively. Results: In Study-1, only 9{\%} of men and 36{\%} of women were vitamin D sufficient during wintertime. After controlling for body composition, smoking and season, 25(OH)D was positively associated with endurance performance (P ≤ 0.01, [INCREMENT]R2 = 0.03–0.06, small f2 effect sizes): 1.5-mile run time was ~half-a-second faster for every 1 nmol·L-1 increase in 25(OH)D. No significant effects on strength or power emerged (P > 0.05). In Study-2, safe simulated-sunlight and oral vitamin D3 supplementation were similarly effective in achieving vitamin D sufficiency in almost all (97{\%}); however, this did not improve exercise performance (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Vitamin D status was associated with endurance performance but not strength or power in a prospective cohort study. Achieving vitamin D sufficiency via safe, simulated summer sunlight or oral vitamin D3 supplementation did not improve exercise performance in a randomized-controlled trial. ",
keywords = "cholecalciferol, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, UVB, endurance, strength, power",
author = "Carswell, {Alexander T} and Oliver, {Samuel J} and Wentz, {Laurel M} and Kashi, {Daniel S} and Ross Roberts and Tang, {Jonathan C Y} and Izard, {Rachel M} and Sarah Jackson and Donald Allan and Rhodes, {Lesley E} and Fraser, {William D} and Greeves, {Julie P} and Walsh, {Neil P}",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1249/MSS.0000000000001721",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "2555–2564",
journal = "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "12",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of Vitamin D Supplementation by Sunlight or Oral D3 on Exercise Performance

AU - Carswell, Alexander T

AU - Oliver, Samuel J

AU - Wentz, Laurel M

AU - Kashi, Daniel S

AU - Roberts, Ross

AU - Tang, Jonathan C Y

AU - Izard, Rachel M

AU - Jackson, Sarah

AU - Allan, Donald

AU - Rhodes, Lesley E

AU - Fraser, William D

AU - Greeves, Julie P

AU - Walsh, Neil P

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - Purpose: To determine the relationship between vitamin D status and exercise performance in a large, prospective cohort study of young men and women across seasons (Study-1). Then, in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, to investigate the effects on exercise performance of achieving vitamin D sufficiency (serum 25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol·L-1) by a unique comparison of safe, simulated-sunlight and oral vitamin D3 supplementation in wintertime (Study-2). Methods: In Study-1, we determined 25(OH)D relationship with exercise performance in 967 military recruits. In Study-2, 137 men received either placebo, simulated-sunlight (1.3x standard erythemal dose in T-shirt and shorts, three-times-per-week for 4-weeks and then once-per-week for 8-weeks) or oral vitamin D3 (1,000 IU[BULLET OPERATOR]day-1 for 4-weeks and then 400 IU[BULLET OPERATOR]day-1 for 8-weeks). We measured serum 25(OH)D by LC-MS/MS and endurance, strength and power by 1.5-mile run, maximum-dynamic-lift and vertical jump, respectively. Results: In Study-1, only 9% of men and 36% of women were vitamin D sufficient during wintertime. After controlling for body composition, smoking and season, 25(OH)D was positively associated with endurance performance (P ≤ 0.01, [INCREMENT]R2 = 0.03–0.06, small f2 effect sizes): 1.5-mile run time was ~half-a-second faster for every 1 nmol·L-1 increase in 25(OH)D. No significant effects on strength or power emerged (P > 0.05). In Study-2, safe simulated-sunlight and oral vitamin D3 supplementation were similarly effective in achieving vitamin D sufficiency in almost all (97%); however, this did not improve exercise performance (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Vitamin D status was associated with endurance performance but not strength or power in a prospective cohort study. Achieving vitamin D sufficiency via safe, simulated summer sunlight or oral vitamin D3 supplementation did not improve exercise performance in a randomized-controlled trial. 

AB - Purpose: To determine the relationship between vitamin D status and exercise performance in a large, prospective cohort study of young men and women across seasons (Study-1). Then, in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, to investigate the effects on exercise performance of achieving vitamin D sufficiency (serum 25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol·L-1) by a unique comparison of safe, simulated-sunlight and oral vitamin D3 supplementation in wintertime (Study-2). Methods: In Study-1, we determined 25(OH)D relationship with exercise performance in 967 military recruits. In Study-2, 137 men received either placebo, simulated-sunlight (1.3x standard erythemal dose in T-shirt and shorts, three-times-per-week for 4-weeks and then once-per-week for 8-weeks) or oral vitamin D3 (1,000 IU[BULLET OPERATOR]day-1 for 4-weeks and then 400 IU[BULLET OPERATOR]day-1 for 8-weeks). We measured serum 25(OH)D by LC-MS/MS and endurance, strength and power by 1.5-mile run, maximum-dynamic-lift and vertical jump, respectively. Results: In Study-1, only 9% of men and 36% of women were vitamin D sufficient during wintertime. After controlling for body composition, smoking and season, 25(OH)D was positively associated with endurance performance (P ≤ 0.01, [INCREMENT]R2 = 0.03–0.06, small f2 effect sizes): 1.5-mile run time was ~half-a-second faster for every 1 nmol·L-1 increase in 25(OH)D. No significant effects on strength or power emerged (P > 0.05). In Study-2, safe simulated-sunlight and oral vitamin D3 supplementation were similarly effective in achieving vitamin D sufficiency in almost all (97%); however, this did not improve exercise performance (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Vitamin D status was associated with endurance performance but not strength or power in a prospective cohort study. Achieving vitamin D sufficiency via safe, simulated summer sunlight or oral vitamin D3 supplementation did not improve exercise performance in a randomized-controlled trial. 

KW - cholecalciferol

KW - 25-hydroxyvitamin D

KW - UVB

KW - endurance

KW - strength

KW - power

U2 - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001721

DO - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001721

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 2555

EP - 2564

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

T2 - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 137976136