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Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals

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Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals. / Betts, Matthew G.; Wolf, Christopher; Pfeifer, Marion; Banks-Leite, Cristina; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Ribeiro, Danilo Bandini; Barlow, Jos; Eigenbrod, Felix; Faria, Deborah; Fletcher, Robert J.; Hadley, Adam S.; Hawes, Joseph E.; Holt, Robert D.; Klingbeil, Brian; Kormann, Urs; Lens, Luc; Levi, Taal; Medina-Rangel, Guido F.; Melles, Stephanie L.; Mezger, Dirk; Morante-Filho, José Carlos; Orme, C. David L.; Peres, Carlos A.; Phalan, Benjamin T.; Pidgeon, Anna; Possingham, Hugh; Ripple, William J.; Slade, Eleanor M.; Somarriba, Eduardo; Tobias, Joseph A.; Tylianakis, Jason M.; Urbina-Cardona, J. Nicolás; Valente, Jonathon J.; Watling, James I.; Wells, Konstans; Wearn, Oliver R.; Wood, Eric; Young, Richard; Ewers, Robert M.

In: Science, Vol. 366, No. 6470, 06.12.2019, p. 1236-1239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Betts, MG, Wolf, C, Pfeifer, M, Banks-Leite, C, Arroyo-Rodríguez, V, Ribeiro, DB, Barlow, J, Eigenbrod, F, Faria, D, Fletcher, RJ, Hadley, AS, Hawes, JE, Holt, RD, Klingbeil, B, Kormann, U, Lens, L, Levi, T, Medina-Rangel, GF, Melles, SL, Mezger, D, Morante-Filho, JC, Orme, CDL, Peres, CA, Phalan, BT, Pidgeon, A, Possingham, H, Ripple, WJ, Slade, EM, Somarriba, E, Tobias, JA, Tylianakis, JM, Urbina-Cardona, JN, Valente, JJ, Watling, JI, Wells, K, Wearn, OR, Wood, E, Young, R & Ewers, RM 2019, 'Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals', Science, vol. 366, no. 6470, pp. 1236-1239. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aax9387

APA

Betts, M. G., Wolf, C., Pfeifer, M., Banks-Leite, C., Arroyo-Rodríguez, V., Ribeiro, D. B., Barlow, J., Eigenbrod, F., Faria, D., Fletcher, R. J., Hadley, A. S., Hawes, J. E., Holt, R. D., Klingbeil, B., Kormann, U., Lens, L., Levi, T., Medina-Rangel, G. F., Melles, S. L., ... Ewers, R. M. (2019). Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals. Science, 366(6470), 1236-1239. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aax9387

Vancouver

Betts MG, Wolf C, Pfeifer M, Banks-Leite C, Arroyo-Rodríguez V, Ribeiro DB et al. Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals. Science. 2019 Dec 6;366(6470):1236-1239. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aax9387

Author

Betts, Matthew G. ; Wolf, Christopher ; Pfeifer, Marion ; Banks-Leite, Cristina ; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor ; Ribeiro, Danilo Bandini ; Barlow, Jos ; Eigenbrod, Felix ; Faria, Deborah ; Fletcher, Robert J. ; Hadley, Adam S. ; Hawes, Joseph E. ; Holt, Robert D. ; Klingbeil, Brian ; Kormann, Urs ; Lens, Luc ; Levi, Taal ; Medina-Rangel, Guido F. ; Melles, Stephanie L. ; Mezger, Dirk ; Morante-Filho, José Carlos ; Orme, C. David L. ; Peres, Carlos A. ; Phalan, Benjamin T. ; Pidgeon, Anna ; Possingham, Hugh ; Ripple, William J. ; Slade, Eleanor M. ; Somarriba, Eduardo ; Tobias, Joseph A. ; Tylianakis, Jason M. ; Urbina-Cardona, J. Nicolás ; Valente, Jonathon J. ; Watling, James I. ; Wells, Konstans ; Wearn, Oliver R. ; Wood, Eric ; Young, Richard ; Ewers, Robert M. / Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals. In: Science. 2019 ; Vol. 366, No. 6470. pp. 1236-1239.

Bibtex- Download

@article{a177a285faae4831a95ea54023c96236,
title = "Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals",
abstract = "Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the hypothesis that forest fragmentation sensitivity - affected by avoidance of habitat edges - should be driven by historical exposure to, and therefore species' evolutionary responses to disturbance. Using a database containing 73 datasets collected worldwide (encompassing 4489 animal species), we found that the proportion of fragmentation-sensitive species was nearly three times as high in regions with low rates of historical disturbance compared with regions with high rates of disturbance (i.e., fires, glaciation, hurricanes, and deforestation). These disturbances coincide with a latitudinal gradient in which sensitivity increases sixfold at low versus high latitudes. We conclude that conservation efforts to limit edges created by fragmentation will be most important in the world's tropical forests.",
author = "Betts, {Matthew G.} and Christopher Wolf and Marion Pfeifer and Cristina Banks-Leite and V{\'i}ctor Arroyo-Rodr{\'i}guez and Ribeiro, {Danilo Bandini} and Jos Barlow and Felix Eigenbrod and Deborah Faria and Fletcher, {Robert J.} and Hadley, {Adam S.} and Hawes, {Joseph E.} and Holt, {Robert D.} and Brian Klingbeil and Urs Kormann and Luc Lens and Taal Levi and Medina-Rangel, {Guido F.} and Melles, {Stephanie L.} and Dirk Mezger and Morante-Filho, {Jos{\'e} Carlos} and Orme, {C. David L.} and Peres, {Carlos A.} and Phalan, {Benjamin T.} and Anna Pidgeon and Hugh Possingham and Ripple, {William J.} and Slade, {Eleanor M.} and Eduardo Somarriba and Tobias, {Joseph A.} and Tylianakis, {Jason M.} and Urbina-Cardona, {J. Nicol{\'a}s} and Valente, {Jonathon J.} and Watling, {James I.} and Konstans Wells and Wearn, {Oliver R.} and Eric Wood and Richard Young and Ewers, {Robert M.}",
year = "2019",
month = dec,
day = "6",
doi = "10.1126/science.aax9387",
language = "English",
volume = "366",
pages = "1236--1239",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE",
number = "6470",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals

AU - Betts, Matthew G.

AU - Wolf, Christopher

AU - Pfeifer, Marion

AU - Banks-Leite, Cristina

AU - Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor

AU - Ribeiro, Danilo Bandini

AU - Barlow, Jos

AU - Eigenbrod, Felix

AU - Faria, Deborah

AU - Fletcher, Robert J.

AU - Hadley, Adam S.

AU - Hawes, Joseph E.

AU - Holt, Robert D.

AU - Klingbeil, Brian

AU - Kormann, Urs

AU - Lens, Luc

AU - Levi, Taal

AU - Medina-Rangel, Guido F.

AU - Melles, Stephanie L.

AU - Mezger, Dirk

AU - Morante-Filho, José Carlos

AU - Orme, C. David L.

AU - Peres, Carlos A.

AU - Phalan, Benjamin T.

AU - Pidgeon, Anna

AU - Possingham, Hugh

AU - Ripple, William J.

AU - Slade, Eleanor M.

AU - Somarriba, Eduardo

AU - Tobias, Joseph A.

AU - Tylianakis, Jason M.

AU - Urbina-Cardona, J. Nicolás

AU - Valente, Jonathon J.

AU - Watling, James I.

AU - Wells, Konstans

AU - Wearn, Oliver R.

AU - Wood, Eric

AU - Young, Richard

AU - Ewers, Robert M.

PY - 2019/12/6

Y1 - 2019/12/6

N2 - Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the hypothesis that forest fragmentation sensitivity - affected by avoidance of habitat edges - should be driven by historical exposure to, and therefore species' evolutionary responses to disturbance. Using a database containing 73 datasets collected worldwide (encompassing 4489 animal species), we found that the proportion of fragmentation-sensitive species was nearly three times as high in regions with low rates of historical disturbance compared with regions with high rates of disturbance (i.e., fires, glaciation, hurricanes, and deforestation). These disturbances coincide with a latitudinal gradient in which sensitivity increases sixfold at low versus high latitudes. We conclude that conservation efforts to limit edges created by fragmentation will be most important in the world's tropical forests.

AB - Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the hypothesis that forest fragmentation sensitivity - affected by avoidance of habitat edges - should be driven by historical exposure to, and therefore species' evolutionary responses to disturbance. Using a database containing 73 datasets collected worldwide (encompassing 4489 animal species), we found that the proportion of fragmentation-sensitive species was nearly three times as high in regions with low rates of historical disturbance compared with regions with high rates of disturbance (i.e., fires, glaciation, hurricanes, and deforestation). These disturbances coincide with a latitudinal gradient in which sensitivity increases sixfold at low versus high latitudes. We conclude that conservation efforts to limit edges created by fragmentation will be most important in the world's tropical forests.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076274273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.aax9387

DO - 10.1126/science.aax9387

M3 - Article

C2 - 31806811

AN - SCOPUS:85076274273

VL - 366

SP - 1236

EP - 1239

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 6470

ER -

ID: 176579159