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Ethics and social responsibility in practice: interpreters and translators engaging with and beyond the professions

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Ethics and social responsibility in practice: interpreters and translators engaging with and beyond the professions. / Drugan, Joanna.

In: The Translator, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2017, p. 126-142 .

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@article{a760504aaf2f4a0fa68ea4b548072ce6,
title = "Ethics and social responsibility in practice: interpreters and translators engaging with and beyond the professions",
abstract = "Interpreting and translation are unregulated activities in most countries, yet interpreters and translators perform challenging work in sensitive domains, such as the law, medicine and social work. Other professionals working in these sectors must complete formal ethics training to qualify, then subscribe to Codes of Practice or Ethics. When they face ethical challenges in their work, they can access ongoing support. They must undertake regular refresher training in ethics. Interpreters and translators rarely have access to this sort of ethical infrastructure. This places the onus on interpreters and translators to reflect on ethical aspects of their practice, for reasons related to both professional performance and social responsibility. This contribution presents original UK-based research with one type of professional {\textquoteleft}clients{\textquoteright} who rely on interpreters and translators, social workers and social work students prior to their first work experience placement. Findings suggest that insufficient attention has been paid to such professional clients and that ethical aspects of professional communication can be compromised as a result. By framing ethics training and ongoing support in terms of social responsibility, we point to some ways in which the different professional groups might communicate and work more effectively with one another and with service users.",
author = "Joanna Drugan",
note = "Published in the Special issue: Translation, Ethics and Social Responsibility ",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1080/13556509.2017.1281204",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "126--142 ",
journal = "The Translator",
issn = "1355-6509",
publisher = "St. Jerome Publishing",
number = "2",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Ethics and social responsibility in practice: interpreters and translators engaging with and beyond the professions

AU - Drugan, Joanna

N1 - Published in the Special issue: Translation, Ethics and Social Responsibility

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Interpreting and translation are unregulated activities in most countries, yet interpreters and translators perform challenging work in sensitive domains, such as the law, medicine and social work. Other professionals working in these sectors must complete formal ethics training to qualify, then subscribe to Codes of Practice or Ethics. When they face ethical challenges in their work, they can access ongoing support. They must undertake regular refresher training in ethics. Interpreters and translators rarely have access to this sort of ethical infrastructure. This places the onus on interpreters and translators to reflect on ethical aspects of their practice, for reasons related to both professional performance and social responsibility. This contribution presents original UK-based research with one type of professional ‘clients’ who rely on interpreters and translators, social workers and social work students prior to their first work experience placement. Findings suggest that insufficient attention has been paid to such professional clients and that ethical aspects of professional communication can be compromised as a result. By framing ethics training and ongoing support in terms of social responsibility, we point to some ways in which the different professional groups might communicate and work more effectively with one another and with service users.

AB - Interpreting and translation are unregulated activities in most countries, yet interpreters and translators perform challenging work in sensitive domains, such as the law, medicine and social work. Other professionals working in these sectors must complete formal ethics training to qualify, then subscribe to Codes of Practice or Ethics. When they face ethical challenges in their work, they can access ongoing support. They must undertake regular refresher training in ethics. Interpreters and translators rarely have access to this sort of ethical infrastructure. This places the onus on interpreters and translators to reflect on ethical aspects of their practice, for reasons related to both professional performance and social responsibility. This contribution presents original UK-based research with one type of professional ‘clients’ who rely on interpreters and translators, social workers and social work students prior to their first work experience placement. Findings suggest that insufficient attention has been paid to such professional clients and that ethical aspects of professional communication can be compromised as a result. By framing ethics training and ongoing support in terms of social responsibility, we point to some ways in which the different professional groups might communicate and work more effectively with one another and with service users.

U2 - 10.1080/13556509.2017.1281204

DO - 10.1080/13556509.2017.1281204

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 126

EP - 142

JO - The Translator

JF - The Translator

SN - 1355-6509

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 66843338