HomePublications

Developmental continuity in the processes that underlie spatial recall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Developmental continuity in the processes that underlie spatial recall. / Spencer, John P.; Hund, Alycia M.

In: Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 47, No. 4, 12.2003, p. 432-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex- Download

@article{2bec912a78f74e46a8a65b65e5fa42af,
title = "Developmental continuity in the processes that underlie spatial recall",
abstract = "This study investigated whether children's spatial recall performance shows three separable characteristics: (1) biases away from symmetry axes (geometric effects); (2) systematic drift over delays; and (3) biases toward the exemplar distribution experienced in the task (experience-dependent effects). In Experiment 1, the location of one target within each geometric category was varied. Children's responses showed biases away from a midline axis that increased over delays. In Experiment 2, multiple targets were placed within each category at the same locations used in Experiment 1. After removing geometric effects, 6-year-olds'-but not 11-year-olds'-responses were biased toward the average remembered location over learning. In Experiment 3, children responded to one target more frequently than the others. Both 6- and 11-year-olds showed biases toward the most frequent target over learning. These results provide a bridge between the performance of younger children and adults, demonstrating continuity in the processes that underlie spatial memory abilities across development.",
keywords = "Cognitive development, Developmental continuity, Developmental discontinuity, Location memory, Memory models, Models of development, Spatial cognition, Spatial prototypes, Spatial recall, Working memory",
author = "Spencer, {John P.} and Hund, {Alycia M.}",
year = "2003",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1016/S0010-0285(03)00099-9",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "432--480",
journal = "Cognitive Psychology",
issn = "0010-0285",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developmental continuity in the processes that underlie spatial recall

AU - Spencer, John P.

AU - Hund, Alycia M.

PY - 2003/12

Y1 - 2003/12

N2 - This study investigated whether children's spatial recall performance shows three separable characteristics: (1) biases away from symmetry axes (geometric effects); (2) systematic drift over delays; and (3) biases toward the exemplar distribution experienced in the task (experience-dependent effects). In Experiment 1, the location of one target within each geometric category was varied. Children's responses showed biases away from a midline axis that increased over delays. In Experiment 2, multiple targets were placed within each category at the same locations used in Experiment 1. After removing geometric effects, 6-year-olds'-but not 11-year-olds'-responses were biased toward the average remembered location over learning. In Experiment 3, children responded to one target more frequently than the others. Both 6- and 11-year-olds showed biases toward the most frequent target over learning. These results provide a bridge between the performance of younger children and adults, demonstrating continuity in the processes that underlie spatial memory abilities across development.

AB - This study investigated whether children's spatial recall performance shows three separable characteristics: (1) biases away from symmetry axes (geometric effects); (2) systematic drift over delays; and (3) biases toward the exemplar distribution experienced in the task (experience-dependent effects). In Experiment 1, the location of one target within each geometric category was varied. Children's responses showed biases away from a midline axis that increased over delays. In Experiment 2, multiple targets were placed within each category at the same locations used in Experiment 1. After removing geometric effects, 6-year-olds'-but not 11-year-olds'-responses were biased toward the average remembered location over learning. In Experiment 3, children responded to one target more frequently than the others. Both 6- and 11-year-olds showed biases toward the most frequent target over learning. These results provide a bridge between the performance of younger children and adults, demonstrating continuity in the processes that underlie spatial memory abilities across development.

KW - Cognitive development

KW - Developmental continuity

KW - Developmental discontinuity

KW - Location memory

KW - Memory models

KW - Models of development

KW - Spatial cognition

KW - Spatial prototypes

KW - Spatial recall

KW - Working memory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0242721056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0010-0285(03)00099-9

DO - 10.1016/S0010-0285(03)00099-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 14642291

AN - SCOPUS:0242721056

VL - 47

SP - 432

EP - 480

JO - Cognitive Psychology

JF - Cognitive Psychology

SN - 0010-0285

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 64348052