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Consumption-based emission accounting for Chinese cities

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Consumption-based emission accounting for Chinese cities. / Mi, Zhifu; Zhang, Yunkun; Guan, Dabo; Shan, Yuli; Liu, Zhu; Cong, Ronggang; Yuan, Xiao-Chen; Wei, Yi-Ming.

In: Applied Energy, Vol. 184, 15.12.2016, p. 1073–1081.

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Mi, Z, Zhang, Y, Guan, D, Shan, Y, Liu, Z, Cong, R, Yuan, X-C & Wei, Y-M 2016, 'Consumption-based emission accounting for Chinese cities' Applied Energy, vol. 184, pp. 1073–1081. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.06.094

APA

Mi, Z., Zhang, Y., Guan, D., Shan, Y., Liu, Z., Cong, R., ... Wei, Y-M. (2016). Consumption-based emission accounting for Chinese cities. Applied Energy, 184, 1073–1081. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.06.094

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Mi, Zhifu ; Zhang, Yunkun ; Guan, Dabo ; Shan, Yuli ; Liu, Zhu ; Cong, Ronggang ; Yuan, Xiao-Chen ; Wei, Yi-Ming. / Consumption-based emission accounting for Chinese cities. In: Applied Energy. 2016 ; Vol. 184. pp. 1073–1081.

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@article{870b88afd0434989954416c5f65b5df0,
title = "Consumption-based emission accounting for Chinese cities",
abstract = "Most of China’s CO2 emissions are related to energy consumption in its cities. Thus, cities are critical for implementing China’s carbon emissions mitigation policies. In this study, we employ an input-output model to calculate consumption-based CO2 emissions for thirteen Chinese cities and find substantial differences between production- and consumption-based accounting in terms of both overall and per capita carbon emissions. Urban consumption not only leads to carbon emissions within a city’s own boundaries but also induces emissions in other regions via interregional trade. In megacities such as Shanghai, Beijing and Tianjin, approximately 70{\%} of consumption-based emissions are imported from other regions. Annual per capita consumption-based emissions in the three megacities are 14, 12 and 10 tonnes of CO2 per person, respectively. Some medium-sized cities, such as Shenyang, Dalian and Ningbo, exhibit per capita emissions that resemble those in Tianjin. From the perspective of final use, capital formation is the largest contributor to consumption-based emissions at 32–65{\%}. All thirteen cities are categorized by their trading patterns: five are production-based cities in which production-based emissions exceed consumption-based emissions, whereas eight are consumption-based cities, with the opposite emissions pattern. Moreover, production-based cities tend to become consumption-based as they undergo socioeconomic development.",
keywords = "Consumption-based accounting, Production-based emissions, Embodied emissions, Input-output analysis, Carbon footprint, City",
author = "Zhifu Mi and Yunkun Zhang and Dabo Guan and Yuli Shan and Zhu Liu and Ronggang Cong and Xiao-Chen Yuan and Yi-Ming Wei",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.06.094",
language = "English",
volume = "184",
pages = "1073–1081",
journal = "Applied Energy",
issn = "0306-2619",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Consumption-based emission accounting for Chinese cities

AU - Mi, Zhifu

AU - Zhang, Yunkun

AU - Guan, Dabo

AU - Shan, Yuli

AU - Liu, Zhu

AU - Cong, Ronggang

AU - Yuan, Xiao-Chen

AU - Wei, Yi-Ming

PY - 2016/12/15

Y1 - 2016/12/15

N2 - Most of China’s CO2 emissions are related to energy consumption in its cities. Thus, cities are critical for implementing China’s carbon emissions mitigation policies. In this study, we employ an input-output model to calculate consumption-based CO2 emissions for thirteen Chinese cities and find substantial differences between production- and consumption-based accounting in terms of both overall and per capita carbon emissions. Urban consumption not only leads to carbon emissions within a city’s own boundaries but also induces emissions in other regions via interregional trade. In megacities such as Shanghai, Beijing and Tianjin, approximately 70% of consumption-based emissions are imported from other regions. Annual per capita consumption-based emissions in the three megacities are 14, 12 and 10 tonnes of CO2 per person, respectively. Some medium-sized cities, such as Shenyang, Dalian and Ningbo, exhibit per capita emissions that resemble those in Tianjin. From the perspective of final use, capital formation is the largest contributor to consumption-based emissions at 32–65%. All thirteen cities are categorized by their trading patterns: five are production-based cities in which production-based emissions exceed consumption-based emissions, whereas eight are consumption-based cities, with the opposite emissions pattern. Moreover, production-based cities tend to become consumption-based as they undergo socioeconomic development.

AB - Most of China’s CO2 emissions are related to energy consumption in its cities. Thus, cities are critical for implementing China’s carbon emissions mitigation policies. In this study, we employ an input-output model to calculate consumption-based CO2 emissions for thirteen Chinese cities and find substantial differences between production- and consumption-based accounting in terms of both overall and per capita carbon emissions. Urban consumption not only leads to carbon emissions within a city’s own boundaries but also induces emissions in other regions via interregional trade. In megacities such as Shanghai, Beijing and Tianjin, approximately 70% of consumption-based emissions are imported from other regions. Annual per capita consumption-based emissions in the three megacities are 14, 12 and 10 tonnes of CO2 per person, respectively. Some medium-sized cities, such as Shenyang, Dalian and Ningbo, exhibit per capita emissions that resemble those in Tianjin. From the perspective of final use, capital formation is the largest contributor to consumption-based emissions at 32–65%. All thirteen cities are categorized by their trading patterns: five are production-based cities in which production-based emissions exceed consumption-based emissions, whereas eight are consumption-based cities, with the opposite emissions pattern. Moreover, production-based cities tend to become consumption-based as they undergo socioeconomic development.

KW - Consumption-based accounting

KW - Production-based emissions

KW - Embodied emissions

KW - Input-output analysis

KW - Carbon footprint

KW - City

U2 - 10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.06.094

DO - 10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.06.094

M3 - Article

VL - 184

SP - 1073

EP - 1081

JO - Applied Energy

JF - Applied Energy

SN - 0306-2619

ER -

ID: 85296282